Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Galerie des Modes, 12e Cahier, 3e Figure


THE DELIGHTS OF THE BOIS DE BOULOGNE.  Gown of solid-colored taffeta in a soft color, trimmed with the same material.  The suit has a yellowish ground, dotted, with white vest and breeches. (1778)

Open and low-cut petite robe, leaving the compere uncovered, topped with a parfait contentement; trim matching the stuff of the dress in ruched bands; volant slightly raised, with a head caught in bouillons; gauze kerchief, untucked to let the two "children of love" take the fresh air.

Négligée coiffure, in chien couchant, with two curls; the brush is in the coque; pouf cap of Italian gauze; solid papillon, separated with a flower garland.  A large ribbon in a bow, with two hanging points, occupies the back of the coiffure.

The other Figure represents a young man in beverlet, with coupé collar; the ground is yellowish stuff, with large black and white spots; vest with open bavaroises,* leaving the top of the jabot visible; drop-front breeches, matching the material of the vest; a cord on each thigh.

Jacquet** hat, furred on the outside, with a gold cord around it coming in the front and ending with an oval button.  Two finger curls, in the style of Clerval.

This young man holds over his arm the mantelet with flared points of his amiable company, and toys with her Chinese paper fan; on the other arm one perceives the end of a cane or a stick with a Manheim golden apple, with a hair cord ending in tassels.

Shoes à la d'Artois with large square buckles, covering the coup-de-pied entirely.

* lapels
 ** possibly relating to a backgammon-like game


6 comments:

  1. These are so much fun! I would really like to put these on Pinterest, with a ref back to your translation (and to your Pinterest account). Is that all right with you? Do you have a preferred method/format you would like me to use, or extra info you want me to include in the pin text?

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    1. That is totally fine with me! I'd like it if you could mention that it's my translation in the pin somewhere - I wouldn't have thought it necessary but (I blush to say) one time someone reposted a post of mine on Tumblr instead of reblogging it because they thought the text was from the Met, so I suppose credit would be good.

      I actually pinned ALL of the plates from the MFA to Pinterest a while ago, and now I'm deleting the pins because I don't need them and they take up so much space ... so tedious, and of course as I go there's the worry that I'll wish I hadn't. But it is all going to be on my blog, so.

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    2. Thank you! And I'll definitely credit you for the translation. That's what makes these so incredibly useful, not to mention fascinating. And a heck of a lot of work!

      I know what you mean. I spent quite a lot of time recently trying to organize my pins. It was actually nice to clean some things out, and be able to focus on what I'm interested in.

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    3. FYI, here's the board I have set up. What do you think of the text?
      http://pinterest.com/SceneInThePast/1750-1799-georgian-galerie-des-modes-translated/

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  2. Now I'm very curious about how many women were actually exposing their breasts on a daily basis!

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    1. I know, right? So many of these fashion plates ... I honestly can't tell if it's some kind of "different standards" thing or if possibly the publishers were trying to attract multiple audiences.

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