Monday, October 12, 2015

Regency Women's Dress is available!

Finally, Regency Women's Dress is now actually available! If you preordered it over the last few months, it should be coming to you very soon. I'd love to hear what you think!

Last week, Joy Melcher sold the first copy of the book at the JASNA event in Kentucky ... and then sold out! I'm so excited. And a little worried that everyone's going to hate it. But mostly excited.

And, of course, thinking if the next book. As you may remember, I already wrote a book on the 18th century, but I've found some more collections in the meantime and look forward to adding to the patterns I took for it. Would being published give me enough cachet to be allowed to pattern the bizarre-silk early 18th century mantua at the Met? (Almost definitely not.) But maybe! (No.)

10 comments:

  1. I say yes to the mantua! My copy left the UK on the 8th, and I'm getting all twitchy checking the mailbox here in Australia.

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    1. Wouldn't that be great? It's so unlikely but would also be so cool.

      Can't wait for you to get it! I'm eagerly awaiting reviews.

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  2. Hooray; going to order! Sure wish I could have made it to the conference; it sounded wonderful. Here I am just an hour or so away, but we had company from out of town who come to the races each year on the same weekend.

    Say, is the 18th century book out of print? What is the title and is it possible to find a copy?

    Very best,

    Natalie

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    1. The 18th century book has not been published. It's what I originally submitted to Batsford - I had completely finished it instead of just writing a proposal because I had the time and thought I might have to self-publish, so (my thought process ran) why sit around and wait for them to turn me down? So there are no copies yet, although as always I'm happy to send pattern files with descriptions around if there's something somebody's looking for in particular.

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  3. Dear Cassidy,
    Ah, so the 18th century book is to follow! Certainly hope it does, because the garments are so interesting. You didn't perchance find a mantelet or caluchin or oak, did you? Jill Le Pore's Book of Ages quotes an ad for millinery items made by Jane Mecom, sister to Ben Franklin, in Boston in the 1760s. Outerwear is hard to locate and so interesting.

    In the meantime, a pattern for a 1760s-70s dress apron would be lovely and I'd happily make a donation to make it possible. I'm wanting to make a pretty linen one over the winter.

    Very best, Natalie in KY

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    1. I did find a sarcenet mantelet, but don't remember if I actually patterned it at the time - I was focusing on gowns. One of the things I'd like to do with the text I have is expand it to include stays, shifts, cloaks, etc. like this book, to make it more of a "create a full wardrobe" thing. At the time, when I was thinking it would be self-published, I planned a whole series: 18th century, early 19th, late 19th, all of just regular clothing, then an underwear book and an outerwear book. The full-wardrobe setup might be more sensible, though.

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  4. ...Oop, meant to write "capuchin"...

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  5. Dear Cassidy,
    Agree that a create-a-full-wardrobe concept probably makes good sense, for a couple of reasons. The book could be designed as a practical aid to understanding a woman's wardrobe...although you'd have to address variations in age, social and economic standing, geography, time period, and even cultural variations, and that could get a bit convoluted. Plus, the book can stand alone. There is practical sense in that simplicity.

    On the other hand, perhaps you'd want to focus on the "undercovered" or the less usual. Perhaps you found a garment that shows that there are multiple ways to construct a garment outside of what is currently common in the costuming-reenactment communities.

    Anyhow, I remain excited by your taking on American garments and patterning them. Every pattern and examination is another step in broadening our understanding.

    Very best,

    Natalie

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    1. The patterns I've taken for it already do generally focus on variations from the norm - this wouldn't be like Costume Close-Up, which intends to have representative patterns. I just think I like the idea that there's at least some examples of the various things you'd put on your body, so that you do have some variety from the pieces in previous pattern books that have been essentially defaults, if that makes sense. There's a gown with the back pleats pointing inward, for instance, and a gown and petticoat with applied harpie-style trim, one with curved front edges, etc.

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